Carol Blog Why do so many women say "I’m not Creative" ?

Why do so many women say "I’m not Creative" ?

Yes you are!
I meet  many women who are interested in learning about  Mandalas and the medARTation of colouring them. 

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Some women will say,  I’m not creative but I’d like to colour one of those Mandalas

I am  interested in the process that leads to  someone deciding I am not Creative



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Every day in kindergartens and pre schools across the country little children are creating stories, making art, dancing, singing songs and painting all day, as one spark of an imaginative idea fires up another in the rich wonderland of the children’s inner world.
We were all that child once.

Many years ago I read of an experiment whereby a group of researchers went into a kindergarten asked the children questions related to their creativity.

Who can draw? All hands went up in the room and children began pointing to their master pieces on the wall. 

Who can dance? The same excited, uninhibited revelry erupted and some began a spontaneous display of their favourite move.

The children’s responses were an affirmation that creativity and imagination are very active and easily stimulated in the early childhood setting.

The team then went into a high school and posed the same questions to a group of 15 year olds. 

Who can draw? Amidst embarrassed laughter several students pointed to a girl in the front row, Melissa is a good drawer, she’s great, she’s the best drawer in the class.

The difference between the 5 and 15 year old was remarkable. Similar responses were met by the other questions Who can dance? Who likes to tell stories?

The exuberance of children who revelled in their creativity has dissipated over the 10 years. Words like good, better, best defined whether or not someone was considered creative or not.

As the experiment was repeated it became very apparent that somewhere between 5 and 15, children lose their free flowing creativity & will often adopt beliefs that are counter to the innovation, art,  song, dance and imagination that marked the richness of their pre-school years.

An early child hood worker was in one of my ART of Change  groups recently and she told me that it is always difficult to see her children leave to go into the ‘big school’ on the other side of the oval. She said  she knew they would have  to sit still for long periods, play less, tell fewer stories and have to reign in the impetus to jump, dance, shout and play in order to conform the expectations of a ‘well behaved’ class. 

She said she often comes across one of her little story tellers or artists a couple of years later and can see how their  flame of creative energy has begun to dwindle.

Perhaps those of us who have adopted a belief of I am not creative  have simply forgotten the free flowing imagination and world of possibility that we were immersed in as magical children?

It occurred to me that, as adults,  many people are  Magical Children in Exile, holding beliefs like my sister is the creative one in our family  or  I have no imagination  when in fact there is a huge well of unexplored creativity and imagination inside all of us, the very same unlimited creativity that we were immersed in when we were little children.

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The good news is that there are many ways to reclaim  lost creativity!  

Sitting and colouring a Mandala can warm up the imagination and inspire new thoughts and ideas as we tap into the peaceful silence of the medARTative state. 

The rhythmic hand motions as we colour is like a mantra and our breathing slows down as we move into a restful, creative state.

It is in this state that we tap into  the imagination and deeper aspects of our mind that are accessed in silence, beyond the noise of the external world and our internal chatter.

Says these three magical words out loud & feel the difference!







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